Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Cosplayers At Dastaan-E-Pakistan

en Best Cosplayers At Dastaan-E-Pakistan Comic Con 2015

A three day comic convention Dastaan-e-Pakistan Comic Convention 2015 (DPCC) or more casually a meet up took place on 20, 21 and 22 February at Kidz Dunya, Karachi.
The Comic convention was setup especially to bring the stars and their fans on one platform. There were some social media icons including Babrus Khan, the guys behind Bakwas Vines and many more.
One of the organizers Ahmed Saeed, CEO of Kalaam Studios said the comic con was organized to bring in all the new talent at one place so their fans and admirers can meet them.
Apart from book stalls, discussions, question sessions and Xbox gaming the prominent features were the release of Saker Comics by Lucid Concepts.
And last but not the least were the cosplays.
Now as comic conventions are bit boring without cosplays – and totally dull without ranking those cosplays – so we have just done that…
Here is the list.

10. Vandetta & Ironman

 photo RobinandVandetta.jpg
9. These three guys

 photo thesethreeguys.jpg

8. Kakashi

 photo Kakashi.jpg

7. Robin and Rorschach

 photo Robinandrorschach.jpg

6. Captain Jack Sparrow

 photo CaptainJackSparrow.jpg

5. Pyramid Head
 photo Hammerhead.jpg

4. Robbers from Pay Day 2
 photo Jokergang.jpg

3. Bloody Nasreen
 photo Bloodynasreen.jpg

2. Riddler
 photo Riddler.jpg

1. Hawkeye
 photo Hawkeye.jpg

Images taken from Dawn.com .

Archie Creator Tom Moore No more now.

The famous cartoonist, Tom Moore who was responsible for adding life to the world famous animated comic characters like Archie from the fictional city of Riverdale, passed away in hospice care at his native of El Paso, Texas on early Monday morning. Tom Moore (86), was diagnosed with throat cancer in the earlier week.
Archie Comics’ editor in chief, Victor Gorelick, who has worked at the company for more than 50 years, said Moore “was a cartoonist’s cartoonist.” “Tom was very funny and had a knack for putting together really great, hilarious gags and special pages when he worked at Archie,” said Gorelick. “He was probably best known here for inking our Jughead relaunch decades ago. We’re all sad to hear this news and wish his family the very best during this time.”
Archie Comic created by Maurice Coyne, Louis Silberkleit and John L. Goldwater is known for its many series featuring the fictional teenagers Archie Andrews, Cooper, Veronica, Reggie Mantle, and Jughead Jones set in a small town of Riverdale.
Archie-Tom-Moore
Moore drew Archie Andrews and his friends on and off from 1953 until he retired in the late 1980s. Moore, who studied under the supreme guidance of the Tarzan comic strip illustrator Bume Hogarth, had initially used the GI bill funding to study at a school for cartoonists in New York. Soon after, Moore signed up with the Archie comic which he took over in 1953 after Bob Montana created Archie in 1941.
He and his family moved from Long Island, New York, back to his native El Paso in 1961, and he later took a break from comics and worked in public relations.
After retiring, Moore kept tabs on Archie and strongly disagreed when the comic book company decided to kill off the character. The El Paso Museum of Art displayed some of Moore’s work and his vast comic collection about 20 years ago.”I have enjoyed what I’ve done and I am pleased that others liked it, too. I think it’s such a kick that my stuff is going to be hanging at the museum. Who knew Archie would have such universal appeal?” Moore said at that time.
Moore is now survived by Ruth (63) his wife, son Lito Bujanda-Moore and also a daughter, Holly Mathew.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Pakistani Comic Con

                   Sunday at Dastaan-e-Pakistan                              Comic Con








A three-day comic convention called Dastaan-e-Pakistan was held at Karachi's Dolmen City Mall this weekend, where enthusiasts dressed up as their favourite comic and film characters and enjoyed a meet-and-greet with the some artists from our local comic industry.
The arrangements for the convention, which was more like a meet-up between friends, were made at Kidz Dunya at the mall where stalls were set up by various artists in the alleyways of the play area. Digital artists Babrus Khan, Saad Irfan and Areesha Khawaja, who have over thousands of fans on Facebook, were amongst those that attended Dastaan-e-Pakistan.
"Dastaan-e-Pakistan's purpose is not only to promote comics in Pakistan but to promote all kinds of artistic and creative fields and all the talented people working within those fields," said Akbar Nazir Shoro, one of the organisers.
"The idea came into being when Kalaam Studios and Kidz Dunya came together to create a comic for younger readers, called 'Alif Dastaan'. We wanted to promote our comic and one thing lead to another and we decided to promote the entire industry itself!" Akbar added.
Amidst the stalls there were selling vintage DC and Marvel comics and graphic novels was a stall by Lucid Concepts, who recently released their first ever Pakistani comic book called 'Saker'.
"We always wanted to do a comic book on a Pakistani hero, so we came up with the idea of Saker," said Saad Irfan, one of the artists from Lucid Concepts who has around 11,000 fans on Facebook. "The idea behind the whole comic book was to create awareness about comic books, like the real ones, not four-page books or cartoons you see on Facebook but an actual 22 page comic book."
"We made this book in our free time, then pooled in for the printing cost from our own pockets. We will do five more issues and we need all the support we can get," Irfan added.
No comic con is complete without Cosplay, and all three days of Dastaan-e-Pakistan saw a number of enthusiasts with costumes and weapons most of them made themselves. Considering the fact that comic cons are not very common in Karachi, Dastaan-e-Pakistan had its pros and cons, one of the cons being the stuffy venue. On the other hand, like all interactive events, comic cons in Pakistan too are something that need more funding and support to help them grow.
                                     Ainak Wala Jinn and Maula Jutt mugs by Dastaan-e-Pakista
A stall displaying vintage comics
                                     A stall displaying vintage comics
Artists like Babrus Khan assemble on stage
                                     Artists like Babrus Khan assemble on stage
A stall of art prints set up by Komal from Komalash Artwork
                                    A stall of art prints set up by Komal from Komalash Artwork
Cosplayers dressed up as Julian (Little Fighter 2), Captain Jack Sparrow (Pirates of the Carribean) and Bloody Nasreen (Shahan Zaidi)
                                    Cosplayers dressed up as Julian (Little Fighter 2), Captain Jack Sparrow (Pirates of the Carribean) and Bloody Nasreen (Shahan''
















                                          Zaidi)
    
Prints by digital artists from Lucid Concepts
                                    Prints by digital artists from Lucid Concepts
Enthusiasts taking part in a Duel Masters tournament
                                    Enthusiasts taking part in a Duel Masters tournament
No Face (Spirited Away), Lady Two Face (DC) with Zaraki Kenpachi (Bleach) and Kaneki Ken (Tokyo Ghoul) posing with one of the organisers.
                                     No Face (Spirited Away), Lady Two Face (DC) with Zaraki Kenpachi (Bleach) and Kaneki Ken (Tokyo Ghoul) posing with one of the organisers.
Leona (King of Fighters) poses with Ramona Hammers (Scott Pilgrim), Pyramid Head (Silent Hill) and Ryu (Street Fighter)
                                    Leona (King of Fighters) poses with Ramona Hammers (Scott Pilgrim), Pyramid Head (Silent Hill) and Ryu (Street Fighter)
Merchandise and artwork designed by Abeer Kasiri of A.K Toonify
                                      Merchandise and artwork designed by Abeer Kasiri of A.K Toonify
 
Uncle Sargam T-shirt by Dastaan-e-Pakistan
                                     Uncle Sargam T-shirt by Dastaan-e-Pakistan
Left: Live digital painting by the digital artist Saad Irfan of Lucid Concepts. Right: Saad Irfan poses with Saker, the first comic book by Lucid Concepts that he did the artwork for along with Anas Riasat, Shahan Zaidi and Adnan Ali
Left: Live digital painting by the digital artist Saad Irfan of Lucid Concepts. Right: Saad Irfan poses with Saker, the first comic book by Lucid Concepts that he did the artwork for along with Anas Riasat, Shahan Zaidi and Adnan Ali

Monday, June 29, 2015

Sufi Comics

Islam 101: The rise of Sufi Comics

Sunday, 21 June 2015
    rothers Arif and Ali Vakil are making the religion accessible not only to Muslims but to people of all faiths across the world. Marisha Karwa reports
  • Ali and Arif Wakil
Mohammed Ali Vakil doesn't put it this way, but it all started with an algorithm. Had it not been for an "Amazon suggestion," perhaps Ali would not have come across Michael J. Gelb's How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci. For it was after reading this book that Ali took to drawing, and eventually turned the "pastime" into what is now a pet project for himself and elder brother Arif — Sufi Comics.
When he was toying with the idea of doing something concrete with his sketches back in 2009, two childhood memories stood out in Ali and Arif's minds: the staple diet of comics, including Tinkle, that they consumed and the numerous faith stories they had learnt at their local madrasa in Dubai. This is what prompted the now-Bangalore-based bloggers, who work full-time in the family's construction business, to do a "visual blog post" re-telling one of the stories from their faith.Six years after that first black-and-white strip, Arif and Ali's passion for spirituality and comics has manifested into fortnightly web comics that cover wide ground, including forgiveness, cultivating inner peace, how to do business, how to pray and anecdotes on the creator, existence and contemplation. Somewhere along the journey, the brothers added colour to the comics, imbibed calligraphy and Turkish and Persian motifs, published three comic books — 40 Sufi Comics(2011), The Wise Fool of Baghdad (2012) and Rumi (2014) — participated in numerous Comic Con events across India, brought out e-book versions for Kindle and roped in other artist-collaborators, including art teacher Rahil Mohsin. "The content," says 36-year-old Arif, "is in the context of Islam but the message is religion-agnostic. People from any religion and even those who don't follow a religion will find it endearing."
The wise fool of Baghdad
Arif's words appear modest given the vast fan following Sufi Comics garners on social media from a cross-section of readers. Reviews on e-commerce platforms for their books too overflow with munificence approval. Sample this, for instance, by an online reviewer identified as D. Beatty, "... The format and nature of the content also makes it a prime candidate for regular re-reading because there is always something more to learn or improvement to be made in its application, and the comics are so brief and clever that they will not become mundane or boring when seen multiple times."
A panel from 'The wise fool of Baghdad'
The panels of Sufi Comics are deliberately writ with humour, philosophy and charm, but what is most conspicuous is the faceless depiction of religious figures in keeping with Islamic principles, and the frequent quotations of Quranic verses. The quotations, informs 33-year-old Ali, a qualified chartered accountant, serve two purposes. He points out that the foundation of the faith is in the Quran, and so it is central to understanding Islam in all its dimensions. "When we make a statement and give a reference to the Quran, it justifies where it is coming from and how it relates to the religion," says Ali. "Also, often times Muslims and people of other faiths are curious to find out what the Quran really says and the graphics make it easier for them to understand how it all fits in."
A panel from 'The Elephant'
Is this not agonising the elders of the religion? "Not at all. In fact, I got a lot of positive feedback about our comics quoting the Quran because we are not picking stories out of thin air."
And who do they count among their readers? Both Arif and Ali explain that the comics resonate with people across age groups, nationalities and religions. "Among the sections of readers are Islamic teachers who want to share this material with their students because we are all learning visually these days," says Ali. "Then there are teenagers, both Muslims and non-Muslims, who enjoy sharing the comics on social media."
"The comics are for children and adults... A lot of parents also buy the books for their children," chips in Arif, a father of two. "I like to compare our work to a good Disney movie. The whole family can enjoy it and they all have their share of take backs."
What's noteworthy is that in its six-year journey, Sufi Comics' panels have been translated into more than 10 languages, including Tagalog (the Philippines), Norwegian, French and Russian, largely due to the efforts of readers. "Within a year of our first web comic post, someone wrote in asking if they can translate it into Indonesian," recalls Ali. Among Indian languages, Sufi Comics are available in Tamil. "We did start work on translating them into Hindi and Urdu but somehow the collaborations didn't take off. But the Urdu translation is now in progress," says Ali, adding that they are now working to complete the second volumes of 40 Sufi Comics and Rumi.
source:-dnaindia.com